Tahoma superintendent resigns

Board of directors appointed Lori Cloud in his place

The Tahoma School District Board of Directors made an unexpected vote during a special board meeting on Monday, Sept. 30, when it accepted the district superintendent’s resignation.

After accepting Tony Giurado’s resignation the board also voted to appoint Assistant Superintendent Lori Cloud in his place.

“The Tahoma School District Board of Directors and Superintendent Tony Giurado have discovered that, through the fault of neither party, Mr. Giurado’s considerable high integrity, skill, knowledge and experience are not the best match for the present needs of the district,” the board stated in a release. “The board and Mr. Giurado have agreed to separate and as part of that agreement, the board accepted Mr. Giurado’s resignation from his position as superintendent effective September 30, 2019.”

“The board thanks Mr. Giurado for his service to the Tahoma community, and wishes him much future success.”

Giurado stated that he is “proud of the work we have done in staying focused on students, listening to our community, and supporting all of our educators. I respect the board’s desire to move in a different direction. I leave with deep gratitude that I have had the opportunity to serve the Tahoma community, staff, and Board as superintendent.”

District Spokesperson Kevin Patterson said the district came to an agreement regarding the statement with Giurado and his legal team. The resignation was a surprise for staff and parents alike.

“It’s fair to say it was a surprise,” Patterson said.

This will be a tough time for the district to go without a permanent superintendent since the board is considering two levies to place on a spring ballot.

The board is meeting over the weekend, Oct. 5-6, to discuss finding an interim-superintendent and the levies. Cloud is not interested in fulfilling the role permanently, Patterson said, and will still also serve as the district’s chief financial officer.

“She will be fulfilling the main duties for now,” Patterson said.

The district released the legal agreement between the board and Giurado on Tuesday afternoon.

According to the document, Giurado’s contract was set to end in the summer of 2021. Since it is being terminated early, the board has agreed to pay Giurado’s salary on the last business day of each month along with insurance premiums for him and his family, along with retirement benefits until 2021 or until Giurado obtains another position within a school district or education-related position.

The document did not give any reason why the board and Giurado decided to have the superintendent resigned other than the previously released statement.

Read the full settlement document here;

Tahoma Superintendent Tony Giurado Settlement Documents by Danielle Chastaine on Scribd

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