File photo.

File photo.

King County to offer grants for innovative recycling, reuse and waste reduction project proposals

Proposers are eligible for $20,000 to $300,000 per project, the deadline for applicants is May 6.

King County Solid Waste Division is making $1.8 million in funding available for local recycling, reuse and waste reduction projects through its Re+ Circular Economy Grant Program.

Proposers are eligible for $20,000 to $300,000 per project. The deadline for applicants is Friday, May 6, 2022, at 2 pm. To apply, visit this link.

Guidelines for the grant process and expectations can be found here.

The county is looking for project proposals in-line with the values and mission of the Re+ plan, which is described as a roadmap for a healthy environment and economy by reinventing our system of waste management.

“Through Re+, we’re deepening our waste prevention and reduction methods. We’re finding innovative ways to match materials with end markets. And in doing so, we’re reducing climate emissions and helping create new jobs in a greener economy,” it reads on the Re+ webpage on King County’s website.

According to the county, over 70 percent of the items sent to the Cedar Hills Regional Landfill each could have been repurposed. The county recognizes that materials like paper, plastic, metal and food waste have value that can be accessed through recycling, reusing or composting.

“In the face of our current environmental challenges, we can’t afford to continue wasting finite resources,” their website read. “A systemic shift is needed to transition from a linear ‘throwaway economy’ to one that prevents waste and makes better use of valuable materials.”

According to the grant guidelines, the county is looking for innovative project proposals that divert waste through reuse, repurposing, and recycling, have benefits that outweigh costs and that help mitigate the impacts of climate change while benefiting the economy.


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