Maritime High School to open in Des Moines

Regional school open to all; Application deadline Jan. 31

Courtesy Photo, Maritime High School

Courtesy Photo, Maritime High School

Maritime High School, a new regional high school administered by Highline Public Schools, will open in September in Des Moines.

Applications will be accepted until Jan. 31 on the Maritime website, and enrollment is open to students across the region who will be in the ninth grade in the 2021-2022 school year. The school will start with only ninth graders.

Duwamish River Cleanup Coalition will partner as a community engagement liaison and the Northwest Maritime Center will provide guidance related to maritime education and fundraising support. The Port of Seattle partnered in the development of the school by convening industry and education leaders and identifying national best practices.

The curriculum will center on the environment, marine science, and maritime careers, including maritime construction, vessel operations, and other careers working on or near the water.

“Highline Public Schools is proud to partner with the Port of Seattle, the Duwamish River Cleanup Coalition and the Northwest Maritime Center to open Maritime High School,” said Highline Superintendent Susan Enfield in a Jan. 11 Port of Seattle press release. “In a region that is a hub for the maritime industry, it is so important that we give students an opportunity to prepare for the good jobs and meaningful careers this field has to offer.”

Enfield has appointed Tremain Holloway as the principal of the new school. Holloway is currently co-principal of Highline High School and previously served as assistant principal at Raisbeck Aviation High School, a highly regarded regional high school in Tukwila also administered by Highline and supported by the Port of Seattle.

The school will be temporarily housed at the Olympic Interim School, 615 S. 200th St., in Des Moines.




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