Extra $600 in federal benefit for unemployed workers set to end July 25

Payment is on top of base weekly state benefit amount

Extra $600 in federal benefit for unemployed workers set to end July 25

Unless Congress acts to extend or adjust it, the additional $600 per week in Federal Pandemic Unemployment Program (FPUC) benefits, available under the federal CARES Act, will stop after the week ending Saturday, July 25.

FPUC is entirely federally funded and available only at federal discretion. State employment agencies administer the benefits but do not have a say in whether these benefits are extended.

“We are committed to supporting both workers and employers as they navigate the changing workforce landscape,” said Suzi LeVine, Employment Security Department commissioner, in a July 16 news release. “ESD and our partners in the WorkSource system are here to help in the search for a new job or a new career, or maintain benefits if you cannot yet go back to work.

“Despite the COVID-19 crisis, many employers are still hiring across the state, and with the expiration of the additional $600 in benefits on the horizon it is a good time to look for your next opportunity. WorkSource offices around Washington offer online workshops, training opportunities and virtual one-on-one help with everything from writing resumes and cover letters, to job application assistance and interview preparation. Go to WorkSourceWA.com for information about your local WorkSource office as well as job listings and resources for job seekers and employers.”

Nearly all individuals currently receiving unemployment benefits, or benefits under the federal CARES Act programs, receive the additional $600 per week on top of their base weekly benefit amount. For those eligible for benefits between April 4 and July 25, if they should get resolution on their claims after July 25, they are still eligible for back payments of FPUC funds for all weeks for which they were eligible.

As of July 11, Employment Security has distributed a total of $4.4 billion in FPUC benefits.


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