Mayor’s Corner – Commissioners helps city work for residents

Volunteer for one of Covington’s commissions this year

Mayor’s Corner - Commissioners helps city work for residents

As the year is winding down and coming to a close, I want to put the spotlight on a very special group of individuals who give their energy, time and talent toward improving the quality of life in Covington.

We have over 45 generous individuals who have stepped up to the plate and are serving as your city’s volunteer commissioners. These invaluable commissioners influence decisions affecting the city by providing advisement and feedback on important matters to the city council. These commissioners also play a critical role in supporting the city’s programs and activities.

Each of our commissioners sacrifice their time to keep Covington “Growing Toward Greatness” as they represent the community’s voice on matters that impact us all. I want to send a sincere thank you to all of our 2019 commissioners for their volunteer service and the accomplishments they helped to achieve this year. We couldn’t do it without you!

There are six commissions that play a vital role in our city. Here is a brief glimpse at each commission and what they do;

Arts Commission — Represents the community interest in matters of art and plans events like the annual student art show and city hall display artists. It participates in selecting art for projects like utility boxes and parks, and participates in special events like Covington Days.

Covington Economic Development Council — Facilitates and encourages the development of economic opportunities and keep a pulse on current and potential businesses. Participates in programs like business breakfasts and city branding initiatives.

Human Services Commission — Assesses youth and family service needs in Covington and determines the priorities. They evaluate and make human services funding requests for local organizations and organizes events like community outreach and resource fairs.

Parks and Recreation Commission — Prepare and review parks plans including long range planning, capital funding, master plans, acquisition and more. Participate in events related to parks and recreation like Arbor Day, park clean ups and special events.

Planning Commission — They direct the preparation of the city’s Comprehensive Plan and Development Regulations and review land use, shoreline and environmental ordinances and regulations. They also perform design review and review geographic subareas and annexations.

Covington Youth Council — Advises the city council on matters dealing with youth in the community. Help involve local youth in local government, increase volunteerism and planning youth activities. They participate in a variety of the city’s special events aimed at youth.

As we look into 2020, commission positions will become available for new applicants as some terms will be ending. Specifically, the Arts Commission is a three-year term that expires in May; CEDC members serve two-year terms that expire in July; Human Services terms are three-year terms, in which two members must be youth, expiring in March; the Parks and Recreation Commission has three-year terms expiring in January; Planning Commissioner terms are four-year terms expiring in August; and the Youth Council has one-year terms for youth positions and a one- or two-year terms for the two adult leader positions.

I invite Covington residents, and those living within a three-mile radius, to think about what area interests you and where you may have passion and/or skills to contribute. Applications, openings and more information can be found on the city’s website at www.covingtonwa.gov/commissions.

Although each commission has set lengths of time for terms, the city accepts applications all year-round that we keep on file when openings arise. Applicants meeting the requirements are invited to interview with the city council who make the city’s commissioner appointments.

If you have ever wanted to get involved in city government in some way, becoming a volunteer commissioner is a perfect way to accomplish that goal. However, becoming a commissioner is a commitment that comes with influence and making real change in the community. If that interests you, please consider applying for an upcoming opening. There are current openings for the Parks and Recreation Commission and the Youth Council!


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