PSE offers bill assistance for customers impacted by COVID-19

$11 million available to help pay bills

Puget Sound Energy will make funds available to help customers who have been impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic through its Crisis-Affected Customer Assistance Program (CACAP).

This includes customers who recently became unemployed, partially unemployed, or cannot work, according to a Monday PSE news release. The $11 million are carry-over funds under PSE’s Low Income Program. With approval from the Washington Utilities and Transportation Commission, PSE made revisions to its program to make these funds available to a broader group of customers.

Funds are also available in PSE’s other assistance programs, including the Warm Home Fund, PSE Home Energy Lifeline Program and Weatherization Assistance Program for income-eligible customers.

“We know this pandemic is deeply affecting many of our customers, and we have been working since its start to ensure no one is without electricity, heat or hot water during this time,” said PSE President and CEO Mary Kipp in the news release. “We are in unprecedented times, and it will take continued partnership and creativity to help as many people as possible.”

This program will be available to PSE’s residential customers in Island, King, Kitsap, Kittitas, Lewis, Pierce, Skagit, Snohomish, Thurston and Whatcom counties who meet the household size and income criteria.

Depending on average monthly usage, a qualified PSE customer:

* Must have a monthly household income limit up to 250% of Federal Poverty Level

* Can receive up to $1,000 in PSE utility-bill credits per household

Click here for more information about the CACAP program, including FAQ and income limits.

PSE was able to launch this program with the help of Avertra, the company that developed the application process and did it at no charge, so more funding could be made available to customers.

PSE continues to offer payment plans and allow customers to change bill’s due date for those who may need additional assistance.

For more information on this program and other program offerings, visit www.pse.com/covidhelp.


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