Maple Valley residents nominated for awards show and more community news

Covington’s call for artists

The city of Covington along with the Covington Arts Commission are accepting submissions from local and regional artists to exhibit their artwork during the 2018 gallery season at Covington City Hall.

Starting in April through December, the artwork selected will be on display for a month at a time. The commission will select the artists

The deadline for submissions is 3 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 28. Artists can submit via email to ppatterson@covingtonwa.gov or deliver to City Hall at 16720 SE 271st St. Suite 100.

Maple Valley residents nominated for awards show

Emily Oaks received two nominations for the Global Beauty Awards Show in Best Overall Talent Category and Best Athlete.

Kassidy Lynne was also nominated for Best Overall Talent in Singing.

The awards show will be held March 10 at the Hyatt Regency in Bellevue.

Tahoma graduate completes training

U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Dagen L. Kramer, a Tahoma High School graduate, completed his basic military training at Joint Base San Antonio-Lackland.

The eight week program includes training in military discipline and studies as well as physical fitness.

Kramer earned his associate degree from Green River College in 2017.

Seventh grader finishes in first place

Benjamin Brady competed in the three-day National Orienteering meet in Augusta, Georgia and returned home with a first place trophy in the JV boys division.

Brady also was able to train with the US National Orienteering Team coach while in Georgia.

The last regular season meet was Feb. 3 for the Washington Interscholastic Orienteering League. The state championship will be held Feb. 17 at Fire Mountain.

Families and individuals are also able to compete on the public course alongside the school teams. The cost is $20 for the day for a group. For more information, visit cascadeoc.org.

Covington honor community members

At the State of the City Address Jan. 30 the city of Covington honored its Volunteer of the Year, Commissioner of the Year and for the first time its Youth Volunteer of the Year. The city also presented the Presidential Lifetime Achievement Award for Volunteerism.

This year, Jacqueline Rigtrup was named Volunteer of the Year. In 2017, she coached eight youth teams made up of 93 players.

Commissioner of the Year went to Chele Dimmett. She serves on the planning commission and is a leader for the Covington Youth Council.

In August 2017, Dimmett took over the roll of planning commission chair when the former chair left the commission.

Youth Volunteer of the Year was awarded to Eden Daus. In June 2017, she was the first member appointed to the youth council. She is currently a senior in high school and attends Green River College as part of the Running Start Program.

And receiving the Presidential Lifetime Achievement Award for Volunteerism was George Pearson.

Those who are honored with this award have spent more than 4,000 hours in their lifetime volunteering. Pearson has helped the city expand roles and responsibilities during his time volunteering.

He also helped the city bring new life to the Jenkins Creek Park when he began cleaning up in 2010.


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