Changes to golf course teed up at City Council

The Lake Wilderness Golf Course has had its ups and downs in the last few years.

At the June 26 City Council meeting improvements to the golf course were discussed.

City Manager Laura Philpot said what needs to be improved is what is up for discussion right now.

“It’s not so much that there’s no desire to do anything,” Philpot said. “It’s that we need to make sure we do what’s best for the community as a whole.”

One of the ideas that came up at the meeting was to create a task force to come up with a plan on how to go about making changes or improvements to the golf course.

City Councilwoman Megan Sheridan said she thinks the city should improve multiple areas of the golf course.

Councilwoman Linda Johnson asked, “How much are we going to spend? Whatever we tweak, it’s going to cost money.”

Johnson questioned whether the city will have enough money to make changes.

According to Philpot, the Parks Commission has asked to bring in a third-party expert to see what direction should be taken.

Councilman Bill Allison said the city needs to bring in an unbiased person to come in and work with the community.

One of the improvements being considered is the restaurant at the golf course.

Councilwoman Erin Weaver noted the restaurant is losing money.

One of the ideas the Parks Commission has considered is to serve food only to the golfers and not the general public.

According to Philpot that idea might save the city some money in the long run.

Weaver also said they need to come up with a timeline of projects.

“We need to know what our staff involvements are,” she said.

Johnson also agreed that a timeline would be a good idea.

“Timing is very important on this issue,” Johnson said. “We need to be careful with what we want to do about the golf course when we can’t really do anything about it (right now)”

Philpot added the golf course is currently “breaking even,” which considerably better than in past years.

Contact reporter Kayse Angel at kangel@covingtonreporter.com or by phone at 425-432-1209.

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