Shared Work helps employers prevent layoffs in Covington

Speakers from the Employment Security Department’s Shared Work program will join members of the Covington Chamber of Commerce.

  • BY Wire Service
  • Friday, November 7, 2014 5:42pm
  • Business

Speakers from the Employment Security Department’s Shared Work program will join members of the Covington Chamber of Commerce to present information about how the program can prevent layoffs and how employers can take advantage of a special enrollment period to save money over the next year.

WHAT: Shared Work presentation at the Covington Chamber of Commerce

WHEN: 11:30-1 pm on Thursday, November 13, 2014

WHERE:       Covington City Hall at 16720 SE 271st Street, Suite 100

Covington, WA 98042-4964

TOPIC: How Shared Work can help you weather tough times, keep good employees

The program is open to the public and the cost is $10 (without lunch; RSVP by Nov 13) or $25 (including lunch; RSVP by Nov 7).  Please RSVP to info@covingtonchamber.org.

The Shared Work Program offers businesses an alternative to laying off workers. Instead, employers may reduce the work hours for permanent employees, and the workers can collect partial unemployment benefits to replace a portion of their lost wages.

This allows businesses to weather downturns without losing skilled employees. It also gives workers an opportunity to keep their jobs part-time while collecting unemployment benefits for time they are not working.

Watch the shared work video (YouTube Video: http://youtu.be/sK3ZQwRWdo0) to learn more.

A 2014 customer survey (PDF, 306KB) showed that the program is helping businesses stay afloat, and nearly 97 percent of participating employers would recommend Shared Work to other struggling businesses.

 


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